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Thread: Aristo JZS147 Stereo Install (Part 1 in a Series)

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    Junior Member Automotive Encyclopaedia infotechplus's Avatar
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    Default Aristo JZS147 Stereo Install (Part 1 in a Series)

    The aim of this technical writeup (or How To ...) is twofold.

    Firstly, I will go through the installation of an aftermarket amp into the boot of Toyota's luxury saloon, the JZS147 Aristo - or Lexus GS300 depending on whether you live Westside or Northside .

    Secondly I will put some information I gleaned from the Aristo 2 Volume FSM up as it relates to the Stereo setup in these cars.

    General Info

    There isn't a lot of information available about the Aristo generally, except for some cross-referenced material with it's sportier brother, the Twin Turbo Supra, as these two cars both share the same engine, namely the 2JZ-GTE.

    I was lucky enough to get hold of two volumes of technical information on the JZS147 from a friend in Japan, and even though they are in Japanese, you know what they say about a picture and a thousand words!

    The first illustration is of the complete stereo system. Both the V (Twin Turbo) and Q (Non Turbo) versions of the Aristo came out with one of two Stereo Systems. You either got a single CD head unit or a 12 stacker/CD changer combo. But there are more subtle differences than that. This illustration clarifies what comes with each version.



    If you got the 12 stacker version, you also got DSP functions, a more powerful centre dash speaker (20W vs 7 watts), midbass rear door speakers and a slightly different amp. The single CD version has a Special Effects (spatial) button that activates a smaller 7W centre dash speaker, fullrange rear door speakers, and a nonDSP amplifier.

    The amplifier is manufactured by Fujitsu TEN. Both versions are multichannelled. For example, 4 x 30W (for each of the doors, which are port vented), 1 x 100W for the 12" free-to-air sub mounted on the rear parcel shelf, and either a 1 x 20W (CD Stacker) or 1 x 7W (single CD) dash speaker.

    Here's how it's all setup. This is the non DSP version. DSP version is the same except for the 12 stacker:



    Quite a nice setup and the centre dash speaker adds to the aural experience by adding some 'space' to the music.

    In Part 2 I am going to cover the making of a false floor for the boot, as part of my amp install.

    Cheers,

    Peter
    Last edited by infotechplus; 24-01-2008 at 11:46 AM. Reason: Replaced illustration 1 with new version
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    Junior Member Automotive Encyclopaedia infotechplus's Avatar
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    Default Part 2: False Floor buildup

    OK. Here we go with Part 2, the boot 'false floor' build:

    Job

    To create a false floor in the boot with an amp recess so that all wires and cables are hidden.

    I'm using a JBL Grand Touring 6 channel amp, model 755.6, that I picked up from Strathfield Car Radio at their recent post-Christmas sale. It's an impressive looking amp with some good specs, ideal for the multispeakered Aristo, without having to resort to multiple amps.



    Materials and Costs
    • Amp of your choice Im using a JBL Grand Turing 6 channel Model 755.6
    • Timber - approx. 5 metres but this will depend on how much reinforcement you want: $11.95
    • MDF Particle Board - 2 of 1200 x 900 x 3mm: $13.00
    • Speaker Carpet (grey) - 2 sq. metres (I bought an end-of-roll offcut from a car audio shop): $20
    • Contact Adhesive 1L DynaGrip Contact and Trim Adhesive from SuperCheap Auto in 500ml tins: $18.80




    • Wood Glue - small bottle, about $3.00
    • Panel Pins (narrow nails) - bulk pack: $3.95
    • Matt Black Spray Can - 2 x Export Paint from SuperCheap Auto: $5.80


    All hardware can be sourced from Hardwarehouse or similar hardware store. Note the size of the timber reinforcing is dependent on the height of your amp to get that smooth, level look.

    Tools

    • Jigsaw
    • Saw
    • Saw-tooth spreader or small disposable paintbrush (for contact adhesive)
    • Sharp Stanley knife or scissors
    • Hammer


    Once you have all your materials and tools, you're ready to start.

    Peter
    Last edited by infotechplus; 12-01-2008 at 03:33 PM. Reason: Typo
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    Junior Member Automotive Encyclopaedia infotechplus's Avatar
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    Default Part 2 continued ...

    Steps

    First, remove the boot floor liner and trace an outline of it onto a sheet of MDF.



    My sheet is a fraction too small to fit the whole shape so I used the offcuts to create the ends. Grab your jigsaw and cut out the shape. Because I'm using 3mm MDF I was able to cut both sheets at once simply by placing and holding them together.





    Each offcut gives you a pair of ends.





    Now for a trial fit in the boot. Each of the three pieces can be laid out for an exact fit.

    What I realised at this point was that my original idea of having a one piece false floor was not going to work as it would be impossible to get the whole unit into the boot. So I decided to make the left hand side a separate piece, almost mimicking the original boot liner. This way I can install the main unit and then slip the left hand unit in afterwards.









    With that small obstacle sorted, we move on to the construction of the false floor.

    Peter
    Last edited by infotechplus; 12-01-2008 at 03:47 PM. Reason: Typo
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    Junior Member Automotive Encyclopaedia infotechplus's Avatar
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    Default Part 2 continued ...

    Place one sheet on the floor and add the reinforcing timber in the designated areas using wood glue and panel pins. Where you place the reinforcing is up to you, just remember that the height of the timber 'cleating' should be sufficient to allow your amp to sit just below the finished floor.





    Attach one end permanently. I made the left side a separate piece. Here's what it looks like in near finished shape:



    To blend all the pieces together I sprayed the underside, the inside, the timber cleats and all the edges with Matt Black. Allow to dry.

    Cover both the small piece and the main floor with speaker carpet, allowing an overlap on the edges of about 5cm, using the saw-toothed spreader and contact adhesive. For more precise coverage, use the disposable brush.



    Make sure you press all the carpet down firmly and along the edges. It dries quickly on a hot day so this shouldn't be too troublesome. On cooler days allow the contact adhesive to go tacky before applying the carpet.

    Here's the finished floor, note the left hand side is a separate piece:





    The carpet is an almost exact match for the original Aristo boot liner. The photo makes the two pieces look different but it must be the light. They are all the same carpet colour.



    Peter
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    Junior Member Automotive Encyclopaedia infotechplus's Avatar
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    Default Part 2 continued ...

    And here's the finished product. The red wire is the 8 Ga amp power cable running from the battery, through the car, to the boot. I'll cover it's installation in the next installment.



    Carpet is a good match for the original boot liner.



    With the amp installed. Notice I didn't enclose the amp too much, allowing for air to circulate under and around it. It is held down by tough velcro strips.





    To prevent the amp from getting scratched I plan to fit a perspex sheet (or lid) over the top, held in place with a small spacer and some screws.

    That's it for today. I'll post the 3rd part of this install - the power cable from the battery - later.

    Cheers,

    Peter
    Last edited by infotechplus; 15-01-2008 at 05:20 AM. Reason: Typo
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    Junior Member Automotive Encyclopaedia infotechplus's Avatar
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    Default Part 3: Power Cable

    This is the third part in this How to ... and I'll be installing a power cable for my new amp in the boot.

    Materials

    • Power Cable - 5 metres of red 8ag from Jaycar: $14.75
    • Battery Terminal post - dual outlets (from SuperCheap Auto): $19.95
    • Fuse holder and fuse - Fusion (from SuperCheap Auto)


    Note: Strathfield Car Radio has amp wiring packs from $55 with all these items included plus extra fuses, and RCA leads)

    Tools

    Spanners: 10mm, 12mm, 14mm
    Side Cutters
    Stanley knife
    Screwdrivers: Phillips head
    Wire stripper
    Trim Removal Tool

    Steps

    Firstly, remove both +ve and -ve terminals from the battery. Then mount the fuse holder/fuse close to the battery. I mounted mine on the inner side by drilling two small holes and using self tapping screws. Also fix the new dual outlet battery terminal to the positive side of the battery. In the photo below, I've reconnected the battery, and installed the power cable into one of the receptacles. [Don't do this until you've finished the job ]



    Run the longer piece up to the firewall, make a small incision in the rubber boot covering the main loom and push the power cable down into it.



    This might take a little patience but is made so much easier by removing the glovebox from inside. You can do this quickly - there are two screws on the bottom hinged edge, and three at the top of the glovebox.



    Grab the power cable and pull all of it through. Cable tie in various places to secure the power cable making sure nothing can interfere with it or cut it.

    To run the cable under the carpet, remove the passenger side lower trims and run the power cable to the rear seat. Replace lower trims once you've done this. They should all just clip back into place. Be careful not to use force and break any.

    Now we have to remove the rear seat squab to get to the boot.



    The rear seat is held down by a couple of plastic sockets. You can easily remove the squab by pushing your hand underneath, near the centre of the seat, and pull up. The rear squab should pop up. This is one of the sockets:





    Remove the rear squab from the car and put it safely aside.

    Undo (but do not remove) the bolts holding the rear back down just enough to allow you to work behind it. I used a light, then went to the boot to see the light through a small hole about half way up.



    Run the power cable through that hole into the boot. Just our luck, it is exactly the right size for 8 Ga wire. Here's the view from the boot, with the power cable already pulled through:



    So, now we have power to the boot.

    Peter
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    Junior Member Automotive Encyclopaedia infotechplus's Avatar
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    Default Part 3: Power cable install

    OK. We're almost there.



    We place our left hand side (small section) into the boot (after first reinstalling the original Aristo boot liner), and then gently pushing the larger section down, and pressing flat.

    Here's our false floor in, and the red power cable ready for connection to our amp:



    And here's the finished job.



    Now we can replace our battery terminals, making connection to the power cable.

    To do

    I still have to run RCA leads to the front of the car, along with remote turn-on wire, Earth wire and reconnect the stock speakers by removing the original amp. For this reason I haven't replaced the seat squab yet. The RCAs etc will run down the driver's side of the car, well away from the power cable. I'll cover this job on another day.

    Any comments, etc are welcome. I trust you got some inspiration to do your next stereo upgrade.

    Cheers,

    Peter
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    "it went up in a jiffy" Conversion King Kedderz's Avatar
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    Default Re: Aristo JZS147 Stereo Install and General Info

    + rep for very usefull information
    pics are as useful as 1000 words and yours are very good ;-)
    RA23 - Twincharged
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    Junior Member Grease Monkey BMWTurbo's Avatar
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    Default Re: Aristo JZS147 Stereo Install and General Info *Lotsa Pics

    Good Hot to mate

    I can't see in the pics clearly enough, but please ensure you use a rubber grommet on the penetration through the rear seat as you don't want the sharp edges to wear through the insulation and short against the chassis..

  10. #10
    Founding ****** Automotive Encyclopaedia Mos's Avatar
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    Default Re: Aristo JZS147 Stereo Install and General Info *Lotsa Pics

    Nicely done Nice write up and good illustrations
    Is it easy enough to remove (keeping in mind the cabling) when/if you need access to the spare wheel?

    But, I'm with BMWTurbo - please get some protection
    The hole should be grommeted, and the cable should be in convoluted tubing or some other protective sheath.

    This is especially critical in the length between the battery terminal and the fuse, where wearing through will cause a fire, or at the very least a lot of smoke - the area around the battery hook being most vulnerable. Covering up the battery terminal and exposed factory crimps is not a bad idea either.

    Personally I would have used one of the spare available fuse locations in the fusebox (plenty that will accept 40-50A fuses) which would maintain a factory look and not compromise any electrical safety features - but that's just me, I like things looking factory

    Mos.
    Admin, I.T., Founding Member, Toymods Car Club Inc.
    2000 IS200 Sports Luxury 1UZ-FE VVTi, 1991 MX83 Grande 2JZ-GTE (sold)

  11. #11
    Junior Member Automotive Encyclopaedia infotechplus's Avatar
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    Default Re: Aristo JZS147 Stereo Install and General Info *Lotsa Pics

    Quote Originally Posted by Mos
    Nicely done Nice write up and good illustrations
    Is it easy enough to remove (keeping in mind the cabling) when/if you need access to the spare wheel?

    But, I'm with BMWTurbo - please get some protection
    The hole should be grommeted, and the cable should be in convoluted tubing or some other protective sheath.

    This is especially critical in the length between the battery terminal and the fuse, where wearing through will cause a fire, or at the very least a lot of smoke - the area around the battery hook being most vulnerable. Covering up the battery terminal and exposed factory crimps is not a bad idea either.

    Personally I would have used one of the spare available fuse locations in the fusebox (plenty that will accept 40-50A fuses) which would maintain a factory look and not compromise any electrical safety features - but that's just me, I like things looking factory

    Mos.
    Hey, both of you. Thanks for those words of advice. +rep to you both.

    I'm putting a grommet in the rear firewall for the reasons you outlined. And I have a plastic cover for the battery but I have to cut it slightly to fit over the +ve terminal. The tubing I've got so that sounds like a good thing too!

    Floor comes out easy enough, after disconnecting amp. Let's hope I don't have to do it too often though!

    Not being overly electrically minded (and a bit blinkered in my approach I s'pose) I never thought about the fuse box but I'll have a look at it. Factory 'look' is good.

    Cheers,

    Peter
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    Junior Member Automotive Encyclopaedia infotechplus's Avatar
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    Default Re: Aristo JZS147 Stereo Install (Part 1 in a Series)

    I've run all the wiring and RCAs from the front of the car to the amp, just gotta finish up and tidy everything up for some final photos.

    Part 2 in this series will be a JVC Head Unit and Jaycar Response 7" LCD TFT screen install how to. Look for it over the next couple of days. I promise a very thorough "how to ..." with lots of photos (as usual).

    Here's a sneak preview:





    Part 2 in the Series is here

    Till then,

    Cheers,

    Peter
    Last edited by infotechplus; 28-01-2008 at 07:52 AM. Reason: Added link to Part 2
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