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Thread: FAQ - National Code of Practice - NCOP Thread

  1. #31
    back into it Chief Engine Builder
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    Default Re: FAQ - National Code of Practice - NCOP Thread

    i havnt looked into it for ages, but cant you do just about anything within reason if you register it as a kit car and make the % of changes to make it a kit car?
    besides the fact they have to have a new motor

  2. #32
    Junior Member Too Much Toyota oldcorollas's Avatar
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    Default Re: FAQ - National Code of Practice - NCOP Thread

    and pass the intent of new ADR specs...
    "I'm a Teaspoon, not a mechanic"
    "There is hardly anything in the world that a man can not make a little worse and sell a little cheaper" - John Ruskin (1819 - 1900)

    AU$TRALIA... come and stay and PAY and PAY!!! The moral high horse of the world!

  3. #33
    I make people cry Chief Engine Builder Draven's Avatar
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    Default Re: FAQ - National Code of Practice - NCOP Thread

    and the new ADRs are not light or easy
    http://www.toymods.org.au/forums/showthread.php?t=7465
    Quote Originally Posted by xero View Post
    and of course campbell newman's completely fucking everything he touches so badly that he should be called dick fingers.

  4. #34
    iconoclast Backyard Mechanic Youngy's Avatar
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    Default Re: FAQ - National Code of Practice - NCOP Thread

    Yes Mick that is true and what Oldrolla and Draven has said also makes it a bit of a task. This is what the Statement reads like from the RTA:

    What if I want to build my own vehicle?

    Vehicles built on specially constructed floorpan or chassis structures are referred to as individually constructed vehicles. Some extensively modified production vehicles are also classified as individually constructed vehicles.

    These vehicles must comply with current design and safety standards as well as meeting recognised standards for strength and controllability.

    A vehicle will be classified as an individually constructed vehicle if it is:
    • a vehicle with a specially constructed chassis (non production vehicle) or a manufactured replica chassis;
    • a vehicle where the chassis has been widened or narrowed (either in places or along the whole length of the chassis);
    • a vehicle with a production chassis which does not retain at least one of the original structural crossmembers in the same place for that chassis;
    • a vehicle where the arrangement of the engine and driveline is substantially changed eg: engine moved from front to rear or to a “mid mounted” position. Also, where the vehicle is changed from front wheel to rear wheel drive;
    • a vehicle with monocoque construction, where the subframe structure has undergone significant structural change such as removal and replacement of subframes with structures of a different design or modifications to inner mudguard panels, if this involves relocation or modification of the subframe rails.

    Persons contemplating building an individually constructed vehicle are advised to seek
    the assistance of an engineering signatory prior to commencing and during the course of the project.

    Roads and Traffic Authority
    Vehicle Standards Information No. 6 Rev. 2, April 2005 Cat No 450705865

    Further information:
    www.rta.nsw.gov.au Email: [email protected]
    Tel: 1300 137 302 Fax: (02) 9843 3821
    RTA Technical Enquiries PO Box 1120 PARRAMATTA NSW 2124

  5. #35
    Toymods V8 Member Too Much Toyota CrUZida's Avatar
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    Default Re: FAQ - National Code of Practice - NCOP Thread

    Kit Cars don't have to have new motors, the motors just have to pass TODAYS emissions laws.

    From memory reading them, any SINGLE car you build is exempt from many of the ICV rules. But if you start a business making kit cars (like the Caterham places) then you have a much tighter set of rules to adhere to.

    Just read all the ICV NCOP's in the top link.
    Peewee
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  6. #36
    back into it Chief Engine Builder
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    Default Re: FAQ - National Code of Practice - NCOP Thread

    Quote Originally Posted by CrUZida
    Kit Cars don't have to have new motors, the motors just have to pass TODAYS emissions laws.

    From memory reading them, any SINGLE car you build is exempt from many of the ICV rules. But if you start a business making kit cars (like the Caterham places) then you have a much tighter set of rules to adhere to.

    Just read all the ICV NCOP's in the top link.
    i was sure they did! mate did the cobra and gt40 kits and stopped because of the new engine regs. i might be wrong but im sure he said thats why he stopped. and i sold a crate motor to a guy that needed a new engine for his cobra for the same reason.
    maybe they changed it, i dont deal with kit cars very often.

  7. #37
    Forum Member 1st year Apprentice
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    Default Re: FAQ - National Code of Practice - NCOP Thread

    I spoke with my Engineer regarding these new guidelines about a month ago. As far as he was concerned, they are still under review and not yet applicable in Victoria but is probably a matter of time.

    He also pointed me to the current Victorian EPA guidelines for modified vehicles. Link below.

    A point of interest is that the EPA will allow a FMIC as long as the airbox is unmodified. Or vice versa. Not sure what the go is with other states.

    http://epanote2.epa.vic.gov.au/EPA/Publications.nsf/2f1c2625731746aa4a256ce90001cbb5/c90ec843f3bbbe8fca256d9f00181c59/$FILE/1031.pdf

  8. #38
    Junior Member Conversion King timbosaurus's Avatar
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    Default Re: FAQ - National Code of Practice - NCOP Thread

    So from what i understand so far...

    There are new standard national regulations that ensure you get a different answer from every engineer in every state!

  9. #39
    Not a patch on a Backyard Mechanic
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    Default Re: FAQ - National Code of Practice - NCOP Thread

    You have summed it up all in one Tim! Well done.

    But in all seriousness, everyone can read the same set of rules and come up with different interpretations of how they apply to your project. If you are not happy working with your engineer, change engineers. If you and your new engineer disagree, write to your State Authority, give them both points of view, and ask for a determination.
    RA23
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  10. #40
    Gobble, Gobble! Automotive Encyclopaedia mrshin's Avatar
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    Default Re: FAQ - National Code of Practice - NCOP Thread

    Ahff, I'm just starting to go through the process again of speaking to engineers about a couple of car projects. Let's just say that the consistancy level sure hasn't changed, and I don't see that happening any time soon...

  11. #41
    Altia ER34 GTT Domestic Engineer JetspeedCamry's Avatar
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    Default Re: FAQ - National Code of Practice - NCOP Thread

    Quote Originally Posted by JustCallMeFrank
    They wouldn't be able to re-enact it retrospectively. That said, if you pulled the car off the road and then had to take it over the pits again, I'd hazard a guess that they'd make you stick to the new regulations.
    Yup. You must meet the regulations at the time of the inspecton. If in the next week after, a new rule comes out, you don't have to comply. However, if the car becomes unregistered and requires approval over the pits again, the car must be "redone" to meet the current rules at that time. So a good reason not to let an old car become unregistered!
    Kind Regards,
    Kurt.

    1998 ER34 ニッサン スカイラインGT- T
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  12. #42
    Toymods Net Nazi Too Much Toyota river's Avatar
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    Default Re: FAQ - National Code of Practice - NCOP Thread

    Hi,

    Does this include "classic registration"? If you register a vehicle under the classic category and then later decide to put it back to normal road registration, does it need to go over the pits then?

    I'm sure that in the case of a vintage car that there would be areas where such an old vehicle couldn't comply with current registration requirements and therefore some things must be taken into account.?

    seeyuzz
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  13. #43
    Altia ER34 GTT Domestic Engineer JetspeedCamry's Avatar
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    Default Re: FAQ - National Code of Practice - NCOP Thread

    Yeah, with Classic (or whatever they call it) rego, the complianc is different. However, i would imagine that this type of rego would be a tad more expensive than normal.
    Kind Regards,
    Kurt.

    1998 ER34 ニッサン スカイラインGT- T
    RB25DET 5 Speed Manual | Blitz SE Return Flow FMIC | Greddy Profec II Spec B BC | Apexi N1 Turbo Back Exhaust

  14. #44
    Toymods Net Nazi Too Much Toyota river's Avatar
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    Default Re: FAQ - National Code of Practice - NCOP Thread

    Hi,

    Classic registration is cheaper, isn't it? I thought it was about $150 per annum to keep your classic registered. Much cheaper than the $400-$500 it costs for a full road registered vehicle. Mind you, there are strcit restrictions on how you can use your classic car when it's under classic registration.

    I was just wondering about the issues in getting a classic rego car back to full road rego.

    seeyuzz
    river
    The thinking man's clown and the drinking woman's sex symbol
    RA25GT - There is no substitute | 18R-G - Toyota's Dependable Masterpiece
    Toymods Car Club Treasurer, assistant Historic Plate Registrar & Forums Admin

  15. #45
    Junior Member Too Much Toyota oldcorollas's Avatar
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    Default Re: FAQ - National Code of Practice - NCOP Thread

    River, i'm pretty sure that to back to nromal rego, you only need to satisfy the requirements of the year of manufacture (as well as any retrospective requirements for basic safety?), same as if you went for a blue slip with unregistered vehicle..

    the staying rego'd thing is mainly for cars engineered to a certain year of rules... ie the small cars with turbo rotors and big V8's, because back then it was allowed, but now it's not...

    so, for example, if that V8 KE30 ran out of rego, it would have to be re-engineered... and thats not gonna happen.
    "I'm a Teaspoon, not a mechanic"
    "There is hardly anything in the world that a man can not make a little worse and sell a little cheaper" - John Ruskin (1819 - 1900)

    AU$TRALIA... come and stay and PAY and PAY!!! The moral high horse of the world!

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